Draft of JAES Action Plan: Millenium Development Goals Partnership

AU and EU The draft of the JAES Action Plan 2011-2013 for the Partnership on the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) as communicated in the report of the 11th meeting of the Joint AUC-EC Task Force (JTF) reads “It has been agreed that the MDG Partnership should focus on a limited number of areas where we think that it can really add value and make a difference.

Specific Task Groups will take forward work in the agreed areas – initial suggestions are outlined below. We would expect these groups to be time-bound. Therefore new areas could be selected on a rolling basis. The same overarching themes of Policy, Education, Health and Food Security will remain.

There is a cross-over in some of the areas below, which are naturally cross-cutting. There is also the potential to set up joint Task Groups with other Partnerships.

We do not downplay the importance of other areas not outlined here. Where they are not included this is likely to be because there is intense work already happening in other fora or we think that more can be achieved by concentrating initially on these areas.

There is also a working document for the MDG Partnership which contains other options and for which Task Groups could be established providing the criteria are met.

A Task Group will only be established where the following criteria are met:
• A number of participants on both the African and European sides expressing an interest in being part of a Task Group in a particular area.
•  Willingness of Member States or Commissions to lead the Group.
• Commitment to resource (not necessarily financial) and to regular and active participation of specific experts.
•    No duplication of the activities of other fora.
•    The Task Group can achieve specific objectives that add value.

I.    Overall Objectives
•    Increased commitment among EU and AU Member States to meeting the MDGs.
•    Take forward concrete activities, initially in the areas of health, gender, education, agriculture, water and sanitation and disability.

II. Specific Initiatives
The suggested areas are not set in stone for the three-year period, but must be responsive to the latest developments. If an issue arises where a Task Group can perform a genuinely useful role, then this can be taken forward. This could be raised initially through any participant/stakeholder in the Partnership, though the Co-chairs and the Steering Group.

The Task Groups will establish the activities, objectives/outcomes expected, participants and timescales in more detail. However, based on the initial suggestions, specific activities are likely to include, but are not limited to, the following:

Priority Action 1: Health
Activities
1.    Launch CARMMA in the AU Members States where it has not yet been launched and provide guidance and technical support for implementation of the strategy.
2.    Facilitate integration of the CARMMA strategy into national health strategies.
3.    Collect and disseminate through a forum convened at regional or continental level best practices on Maternal, Infant and child Health
4.    Assess the impact of CARMMA, including collection of statistical data.
5.    Advocacy for and support Member States’ improvement of human resources for health capacity through development of policies /strategies and plans of action where these don’t exist and support their implementation where they exist.
6. Collect and Disseminate best practices and Support Member States in their implementation of the ‘Abuja Call’ with its new set of indicators as aligned to MDG6.

Expected results
•    By 2013 the Campaign for Accelerated Reduction of Maternal Mortality in Africa (CARMMA) to have been launched in all 53 AU Members States and its strategy which includes child health, implemented in at least 25 Members States
• By 2013 to have More Member States with improved access to HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria services by implementing the ‘Abuja Call’ with its new set indicators aligned with those of MDG 6.
• By 2013 to have more Member States to have strengthened their health systems through improved Human Resources for Health

Main actors: AUC, EC, AU/EU MS, RECs, CSO, Private sector, PAP/EP, UN

Priority Action 2: Gender
Activities
1. Develop a medium-term strategy of cooperation on gender equality and women’s empowerment.
2. Identify and take forward specific measures, including empowering women with disabilities.
3.    Work with other Partnerships to include gender equality in their activities.
4.    Establishment of gender observatory for collection and reporting of data on gender.

Expected results
• By 2011 EU and AU have developed a medium-term strategy of cooperation on gender equality and women’s empowerment.
•    The medium-term strategy foresees measures for empowering the poorest and most disadvantaged women and girls including those with disability.
•    Specific outcomes in 2012 linked to the strategy.
•    Increased number of girls that pass secondary education.
•    Provision of data on gender. Main actors: AUC, EC, AU/EU MS, RECs, CSO, Private sector, PAP/EP, UN

Priority Action 3: Education Activities
1.    Work on developing better networking and information sharing through International Task Force on Teachers.
2.    Work towards development of curricula for special and remedial education. 3.    Encourage use of FTi Equity and inclusion guidelines in education sector planning and reviews.
4.    Pilot approaches to making teaching and learning materials available in accessible
formats.
5.    Take forward activities to strengthen science teaching, including establishing regional centre and enhancing regional networks.
6.    Take action to accelerate the implementation of the AU’s 2nd Decade for Education.
7.    Work on methods for monitoring the Plan of Action.

Expected results
• Accelerated implementation of specific actions under the AU’s 2nd Decade for Education: establishment of the Education Observatory for monitoring the progress made in the implementation of the Plan of Action.
•    Regional centres established and regional networks enhanced for the teaching and learning of Science and Mathematics (possible linkages with the International Teachers Task Force created in 2008 and working to address the teacher gap, particularly in Africa).
•    Increased awareness of disability issues.
•    Enhanced levels of government incentives to reduce economic barriers to education at all levels, such as school fees.
•    Increased numbers of children that pass secondary education.
•    Literacy for adults, particularly women, which leads to reduced poverty.

Main actors: AUC, EC, AU/EU MS, RECs, ADEA, IPED, CSO, Private sector, PAP, UN

Priority Action 4: Agriculture (subject to final confirmation)
Activities
1.    Facilitate the implementation of the Framework and Guidelines on Land Policy in Africa through:
o Enhanced capacity of the AU-ECA-AfDB LPI, RECs, African governments, civil society and other stakeholders in land policy
o Improved land information systems; increased networking, lesson learning and knowledge sharing among practitioners in land policy and increased monitoring of progress in land policy development and implementation
2.    Promote alignment of EU and AU Member States behind CAADP processes and objectives on agricultural and food security harmonization. Disseminate information on CAADP regularly.
3.    Promote demand-led agricultural research for development, extension and innovation.
4.    Accelerate implementation of the African Land Policy Guidelines, involving national stakeholder platforms to disseminate their content at country level.
5.    Improve access to markets for small-scale farmers.
6.    Establish continental farmer forum. Greater participation of civil society and farmers’ organisations, representing both male and female farmers, in policy making, implementation and evaluation.
7.    Accelerate integration of the principles of sustainable development into country policies and programmes to preserve the capacity of ecosystems to provide ecosystem services and accelerate reduction of biodiversity loss.

Expected results
•    Improved alignment of EU and AU Member States behind CAADP processes and objectives on agricultural and food security harmonization
•    Enhanced levels of financing of demand-led agricultural research for development, extension and innovation, involving coordination by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), sub-regional research organisations and the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA) and sub-regional research organisations.
•    Accelerated implementation of the African Land Policy Guidelines, involving national stakeholder platforms to disseminate their content at country level.
•    Improved access to markets for small-scale farmers. • Greater participation of civil society and farmers’ organisations, representing both male and female farmers, in policy making, implementation and evaluation.
•    Development has taken into account principles of sustainable development.

Main actors: AUC, EC, AU/EU MS, RECs, CSO, Private sector, PAP/EP, UN

Priority Action 5: Water & sanitation
Activities
1.    Accelerate the work of the Africa-EU Partnership on Water Affairs and Sanitation as a Task Group of the MDG Partnership.
2. Take action on the AU ‘Commitments for accelerating achievement of water and sanitation goals’ (Sharm el Sheik 2008).
3. Support the EU Water Initiative’s Africa Working Group and African partners by profiling its work and encouraging broader participation and catalysing financial contributions, with the aim to progress towards strategic objectives and annual work
4. Strengthen capacities of AMCOW to provide leadership and of civil society to contribute to progress and to hold governments and development partners to account.
5.    Enhance efforts by EU and AU Member States to implement the AU ‘Commitments for accelerating achievement of water and sanitation goals’ (Sharm el Sheik 2008), including the agreement of a joint action plan under the EU-Africa Partnership for water affairs and sanitation, by 2011.
6.    To ensure that by 2013 the majority of countries have developed and adopted national water, sanitation and hygiene policies, strategies and implementation plans based on broad stakeholder participation (SWAP), sustainable use of resources (IWRM) and realistic financial planning (SFP) and are transforming those plans into actions
7. To reduce the number of ‘off track’ countries for MDG-7, with a specific focus on sanitation being the most off-track MDG in Africa, by increasing domestic financial resources and better targeting of aid where it is most needed.
8.    Development and promotion of common views and understanding on the role of water supply, sanitation and hygiene and integrated water resources management for public health and economic development based on multi-sectoral dialogue.
9.    In relation to the above outcomes, particular attention to be given to the challenges of urbanisation, fragile states and better development partner coordination around country led plans.

Expected results
• By 2013 the majority of countries have developed and adopted national water, sanitation and hygiene policies, strategies and implementation plans based on broad stakeholder participation (SWAP), sustainable use of resources (IWRM) and realistic financial planning (SFP) and are transforming those plans into actions.
•    The number of ‘off track’ countries for MDG-7 have reduced.
•    Increased knowledge generation and exchange among regional actors leading to better governance and informed decision making, including support to the development of early warning systems and collaboration with the African Water Centres of Excellence.

Main actors: AUC, EC, AU/EU MS, RECs, CSO, Private sector, PAP/EP, UN

Priority Action 6: Disability
Activities
1.    Establish collection of statistics in a coherent manner to enable baselines and measures of disabled people’s access to services.
2.    Joint advocacy to promote inclusion of sex disaggregated information on disability in new statistics initiatives.
3.    Support the African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI) to monitor the implementation of the AU programme on disabilities.
4.    Support implementation of AU strategy on people with disabilities. 5.    Inclusion of people with disabilities across sectors. 6.    Engagement of African CSOs in the JAES. Active participation of disability CSOs
including attendance of both EU and African civil society at JEGs/Task groups (as appropriate).
7.    Disseminate WHO guidelines and report on progress.
8.    Information and good practice sharing.
9.    Joint advocacy for disability to be included as part of the overall effort to achieve the MDGs from 2010-2015 (particularly in light of two African-sponsored resolutions on people with disabilities).
10. Encourage EU and AU member states sign and ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
11. Establish a system to address the rights of persons with disabilities and vulnerable groups in interventions to achieve the MDGs.

Expected results
• By 2013 more EU and AU Member States have signed and ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
•    More national and international statistical data sets contain disaggregated information about people with disabilities.
•    More girls and boys with disabilities have access to education. • African Rehabilitation Institute (ARI) is able to monitor and implement the AU
programme on disabilities. Main actors: AUC, EC, AU/EU MS, RECs, CSO, Private sector, PAP/EP, UN”

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